Alliance Life Sciences Formalizes Software Organization, Launches Separate Division

SOMERSET, N.J. / LONDON – October 27, 2014 – Alliance Life Sciences Consulting Group (ALSCG), a leading global life sciences consultancy and technology provider, announces the launch of a separate division focused on life sciences price optimization software and the appointment of Mark Costa as senior vice president of Products to lead and drive the strategic and operational direction of this new software product division.

Costa brings over 20 years of software sales and management experience primarily in life sciences to this division, created as a separate group from the Company’s service offerings in order to provide more effective product development and better alignment with market needs.

Alan Crowther, CEO, ALSCG, says, “Costa has relationships with many of the top 25 pharmaceutical companies, and comes on board at an exciting time for our organization as we experience the growth of this newly created division. We built this separate software division to support an appropriate structure for growth and to allow the right partner ecosystem to evolve around the product. Costa is absolutely the right person to accomplish these objectives, while delivering great customer satisfaction.”

Coming most recently from Revitas, a global life sciences revenue management software company, Mr. Costa is an expert in complex enterprise solution lifecycles and customer adoption of new technologies within the global revenue management segment of the life sciences industry. As founder of multiple information technology businesses, Costa has the experience to direct entrepreneurial and high performance organizations and teams, propelling them to meet and exceed goals and generate the customer satisfaction necessary to sustain high year-over-year revenue growth.

Costa says, “It is exciting, and an honor, to be part of the ALSCG organization. The new structure will help to deliver more value to our customers and partners. I’m looking forward to driving our software business, focused on our customers’ business and their success.”

 

Insight. Innovation. Impact. Integrity.

During the first quarter of 2014, Alliance began our journey to develop a new message that would embody our company as a whole.  Our clients and internal team provided feedback that shaped a new prospective leading to the launch of our re-branding.  Through all of our development activities, one theme prevailed, the importance of our customers.  The ultimate outcome being, that it’s not about what we do but who we do it for and how they benefit.

Keeping both the feedback and the end goals of our customers in mind we developed our new tagline Insight. Innovation. Impact. Integrity. Through this process, we found that it’s not our knowledge, solutions, and proprietary tools that our company thrives on. It’s the team of passionate people.

Who better to ask what the new Alliance brand means then those people themselves? Check out their responses at the link below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvIyErRkDII&list=UUiPA3dAD-HVHSyfsVgQ5mmg

To celebrate the re-birth of our brand, we held a “brand day” party on September 26th, 2014, which luckily for us, and our executive team whom were elected to take the ALS Ice Bucket challenge, ended up being a warm Indian summer day.  Equipped with a Taco truck and various team building activities the day left our team with high moral and many laughs to take with us.

taco truck

 

Alliance’s V.P.Global Client Development Jon Kizner and Executive V.P, Global Sales and Marketing Jeff Erb order lunch!

ring toss

 

CFO Jason Watters playing Ring Toss to raise money for ALS.

ice bucket challenge

CEO Alan Crowther takes the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

 

Alliance Life Sciences Launches New Brand and Website Brings Focus to Customer Centric Impact

SOMERSET, N.J. / LONDON – September 29, 2014 – Alliance Life Sciences Consulting Group (ALSCG), a leading global life sciences consultancy and technology provider, announces the re-launch of its brand and website at http://www.alscg.com.

After a thorough review of its brand positioning and their client’s motivations for engagement, the company debuts it’s new positioning through the tagline: “Insight. Innovation. Impact. Integrity.”

ALSCG is a global innovator that delivers peace of mind and unlocks business value with unique solutions to complex commercial problems. The company combines proprietary technology and consulting to maximize product portfolio value through strategy, insights, technology and customer engagement.

“Our customers think of ALSCG as the definitive go-to resource, helping them to rethink contracting, sales and marketing, pricing and market access operations to meet emerging stakeholder requirements and expectations,” says Alan Crowther, CEO of ALSCG. “We are strategically aligned with our customers to unlock business value with unique solutions to these problems.”

After conducting research utilizing an agency, Alliance‘s new brand direction closely portrays a bold and innovative approach to solving challenges within life sciences, while providing messaging that align with its customer’s motivational drivers.

Through its three practice areas that focus on revenue management through a product’s lifecycle, Alliance creates meaningful and compelling value, with global projects that have included:

  • Pricing study delivered in Switzerland
  • Global pricing system delivered in Germany
  • Health economic study for a “Top 5″ pharma company in Taiwan
  • Animal health website delivered in Chile
  • Emerging market entrance pricing strategy in India
  • Revenue contract management system delivered in the USA

Linking Health Economics and Policy Part 2

Results

The biggest challenge perceived by stakeholders is demonstrating the ‘right’ evidence. Specifically, evidence generation, demonstrating value and insufficient internal experience are the biggest factors playing into this.

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This mainly stems from demonstrating value in a way that is meaningful to
payers. This is best summed up by a Brand Director that participated in the
survey: “Showing value (is the biggest challenge). Is value based pricing a
reality? I’m not convinced yet myself.”

Add to that a lack of experience and expertise internally, which was the
largest output from the people category, and the headache turns into a
migraine. These two factors play into each other, as in order to generate the
right evidence, you need the right resources to plan and execute.

Results – Part 1

Nearly half of the KSFs from the survey respondents relate to the process
and people category. More specifically external and internal communication
and alignment are considered most important. This implies that having a
truly innovative offering/product is not enough on its own to optimize
access.

Surprisingly, having an innovative product does not even score high on the
KSF list, only 11%. Does this mean that pharma accepts that revolutionary
product changes are truly rare, and it’s the expertise of their resources that
truly make the difference?

Image 2

Having evidence to justify the value of the drug in a format that
stakeholders want is what is important, and this requires the internal
expertise to demonstrate that value. Once again, this is best summed up by
a respondent from the survey. The Head of Global HEOR from one of the
companies said, “Clinical data that truly differentiates your drug from its
competition (is the most important KSF). That is still #1”.

What makes a successful launch is a robust understanding of your internal
and external stakeholders. Connecting directly with your customer is
considered essential. Having the experience to efficiently ‘sift through the
weeds’ and find what is truly meaningful to stakeholders’ matters, and
communication internally is as important as externally.

Learnings

Based on the results we tabulated the top 3 learnings that enable
transformational market access:

  1. Know your customer: You must identify and prioritize your
    customers. You must understand their values and beliefs.
    Understand their constraints and limitations. Understand what
    motivates them to take action.
  2. Develop your evidence: What truly makes an impact on their
    values and beliefs? What trial design and endpoints will help them
    move into action? What data design and evaluations best support
    the evidence? What format should the data be in to be most
    relevant to them?
  3. Be crystal clear internally on strategy and execution: What is
    your plan? Who has the experience to execute them? When will they do it? How will they do it? What’s the contingency plan when something goes wrong?

Looking back at the Sovaldi case, how do those success factors apply to Gilead? The company confirmed sales for the first half of the year have exceeded expectations at $5.75bn, which now accounts for nearly 50% of the company’s turnover. These sales suggest the company clearly understood the market environment, and indeed the differential pricing in emerging markets, such as India. Furthermore, the evidence generation was certainly strong enough to warrant access without excessive restrictions. Perhaps a clear internal process and experienced staff also helped drive the process. So despite the continuing political debate over pharmaceutical manufacturers’ profitability, Sovaldi is a clear example of how Gilead has transformed market access.

In summary, market access is a complicated process with many moving parts and many obstacles to consider along the way. Understanding the strengths and shortcomings in your people, processes and evidence are going to be the keys to your success. Planning around these key factors will enable increased market share and ultimately enhanced revenue for your organization.

 

Linking Health Economics and Policy Part 1

Transforming Market Access

In the face of rising healthcare costs and the rapid development of more innovative and expensive medical technologies, there is a growing recognition of the bearing cost-effectiveness has on the decision-making process of healthcare payers.
To gain further insight into the specific issues and key success factors which impact market access, Alliance conducted a global survey with key global and local stakeholders in the pharmaceutical industry.
The clear standout results from the survey highlighted 1) the importance of identifying and prioritizing the most appropriate stakeholder. Getting this first step right is critical to the success of pharmaceutical product. 2) Equally as important is ensuring sufficient evidence generation to provide support for products. And finally, 3) a clear strategic pathway for access to a product must be established by a manufacturer.

Stretching government boundaries or seeking true value?

As the US and EU economies struggle to bounce back after exiting the financial recession, healthcare budgets face constant restrictions and containment measures. Increased scrutiny is placed on pharmaceutical manufacturers regarding the manner in which they price their products. The trend for cost containment is very much alive today, with certain classes such as antibiotics, being publicly undervalued and under-priced.

Cheaper prices have led to global over-prescription by GPs and other healthcare professionals. This heavy overuse of antibiotics has gradually contributed to the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. The number of antibiotics coming to market has dropped consistently since the 1980s, and with no clear market leaders forthcoming, the public may now realize we have hit a ceiling in our development of this class of drugs.

Newer, more expensive antibiotics such as Durata’s Dalvance, will test the current price-conscious healthcare environment. Dalvance, indicated in patients with skin infections, has a better administration profile than generic vancomycin, and may also lead to reduced length of hospital stays. The value of Dalvance lies in the vastly improved patient quality of life and reduction in healthcare resource utilization, albeit at a higher unit cost per treatment than generic vancomycin.

The recent furor surrounding Gilead’s US launch of their Hepatitis C drug, Sovaldi, has shown how a seemingly high price can be politicized and criticized without a clear understanding of the lack of effective treatments within the Hepatitis C treatment landscape. Sovaldi has managed to show a 90% cure rate for patients in a therapeutic area where rates historically have been ~50%. Interferon is the primary alternative agent which is effective in these patients, but with high relapse rates and poor tolerability, the launch of Sovaldi was highly anticipated.

Gilead managed to secure a treatment course price of up to $84,000 in the US, as a result of their solid evidence generation and the clear unmet need for Hepatitis C patients. Sovaldi, however, became a target for politicians as well as insurance companies, with the advent of the Affordable Care Act also driving negative opinions. Add to this, Gilead offering Sovaldi at heavily discounted prices in markets such as India, has led to US stakeholders and key opinion leaders campaigning against the company and its perceived greed.

Historically, pharmaceutical companies have been dogged by severe criticism around ethical standard and an emphasis on business-driven goals as opposed to a patient-focused approach. Health is often seen as a right rather than privilege, and pharma’s close interaction with healthcare systems have often deflected away from inefficient governmental and poorly regulated private systems. Furthermore, a lack of clarity over the true cost of bringing a product to launch, with the manufacturer’s themselves often unable to confirm exact values, has contributed to a lack of understanding around prices which pharma wish to set for their products.

Companies such as AstraZeneca have reported an average spend of ~$12bn on research for each new drug. Healthcare will always remain a controversial discussion point, and the fact that financial gains or potential losses may shape a pharmaceutical company’s strategic directions will always ensure a somewhat negative perception. Avoiding sensationalist media campaigns and a greater clarity around the ultimate goals of pharma will allow for a closer relationship between the public and the pharmaceutical industry.

The Alliance Market Access Survey

As we have seen, market access is the ultimate goal for medical device and pharmaceutical companies, yet it remains one of the biggest current and future challenges for the industry. To uncover the specifics on the challenges and key success factors, we recently conducted a survey with global and local stakeholders to find out more.

We asked the stakeholders two main questions:

  1. What do you consider to be the top three challenges from a price, reimbursement or market access perspective of launching a new drug?
  2. From your experience, what have been the top three key success factors related to price, reimbursement or market access, of launching a new drug?

In our next post we will discuss the results and findings from the Market Access Survey.

Big Spenders Part 2

Image 1

Population is not the best variable to control for since Medicare covers the senior population mostly. If there is a state that has a large population of younger people, the per capita Medicare spending may be artificially deflated. Florida seems to present this case here; the per capita Medicare payouts are much higher than average, but Florida has the highest percentage of senior citizens at 17.3% compared with the national average of 13.29%.

To gauge the efficiency of the Medicare funds we plotted the per capita Medicare payout against the percentage of senior citizens (65+) for each state.

Image 2

While Florida spent only $10 less per capita than New Jersey, Florida was much more efficient as it had to care for more senior citizens. New Jersey had the worst efficiency as it spent the most per capita while having only .21% more senior citizens than the average state distribution.

Hawaii was a very efficient spender as it had a relatively high distribution of senior citizens compared with the national average (14.3% vs. 13.29%) while spending only $117 per capita, which was the third least amount of any state.

Continued releases of datasets such as this provide a great insight into the efficiency of the United States’ programs.

Big Spenders Part 1

With the Obama administration making more data available to the public, we analyzed the CMS dataset containing information on the services and charges performed by physicians and other suppliers to Medicare beneficiaries.

The top 5 states made up 39% of all Medicare charges while the combined 45 other states plus Washington D.C. made up the other 61%. New Jersey and Florida had the highest Medicare spending per capita at $398 and $388, respectively.

We also judged the efficiency of the spending by controlling for the population over 65. New Jersey had the worst efficiency as it spent the most per capita while having only .21% more senior citizens than the average state distribution. Hawaii was a very efficient spender, with a relatively high distribution of senior citizens and spending only $117 per capita.

Transparency

What does the state by state Medicare spending look like?

Due to a new policy put forth by the Obama administration, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) has released a dataset, which contains Medicare payment information from 2012. The data contains information on the services and charges performed by physicians and other suppliers to Medicare beneficiaries.

We analyzed the dataset and looked at the aggregate Medicare payout for each state. The top 5 states made up 39% of all Medicare charges while the combined 45 other states plus Washington D.C. made up the other 61%.

image 1

The top 5 states in addition to making up 39% of the total Medicare payouts also hold about 36% of the total population. When we adjust for the population in the dataset by calculating Medicare payouts per capita, we find which states are spending more or less than the average per capita. Texas and California spent less than the average of the other states, while New York, Florida and New Jersey spent quite a bit higher than the average, on a per capita basis.

In our next post, we will take a closer look at Per Capita Medicare Payouts by each state.

Market Access Survey on Challenges and Key Success Factors

While market access is the ultimate goal for medical device and pharmaceutical companies it remains one of the biggest current and future challenges for the industry. Spiraling R&D and drug development costs around $4-5 billion per a successful drug launch make effective launch planning and implementation more critical than ever to a company’s success.

To uncover the specifics on the challenges and key success factors, Alliance conducted a survey with stakeholders from 38 pharmaceutical companies, each holding positions in pricing, reimbursement, market access, health economics, and policy.  The challenges and key success factors that emerged are depicted below.

picture 1

Picture 2

The key findings from this study are as follows:

  1. Know your customer: You must identify and prioritize your customers. You must understand their values and beliefs. Understand their constraints and limitations. Understand what motivates them to take action.
  2. Develop your evidence: What truly makes an impact on their values and beliefs? What trial design and endpoints will help them move into action? What data design and evaluations best support the evidence? What format should the data be in to be most relevant to them?
  3. Be crystal clear internally on strategy and execution: What is your plan? Who has the experience to execute them? When will they do it? How will they do it? What’s the contingency plan when something goes wrong?

For more information on the specifics around the challenges and key success factors, a white paper is available for download at the following link.

http://www.alscg.com/thought-leadership/white-papers/transformational-market-access-survey-results

To the Cloud Part 2

Image 1

Cost studies once again topped the list making up 33.55% of all studies. There was less of an even distribution in the International meeting as the top four types of studies made up 83.42% of all studies as opposed to the European meeting were the top four studies made up 72.90% of all studies.

Regulation of healthcare studies saw a significant increase in the International meeting making up 1.60% of all studies while only making up 0.42% in the European meeting. Lastly, there were zero risk-sharing posters in the International meeting and five in the European meeting. This may be reflective of the lack of uptake in these types of contracts outside of Europe.

Workshops and Issue Panels

Another way to identify trends in the industry are through the issue panels and workshops. Since ISPOR members submit their own ideas for issues panels and workshops, it can provide a good beat of where things are heading. Unlike posters which often reflect completed studies, workshops and issues panels may provide better insight on the direction of the field.

We compiled a word cloud for both the panels and workshops. The issue panel’s cloud is found below.

Issue Panels

Image 2

For the most part, the most popular words contained in the titles are predictable as health care, new, technology and time. A few interesting trends emerged with real world, personalized data, personalizing, and risk-sharing.

There seems to be a good amount of focus being put around the new personalized medicines and available data along with risk-sharing and, of course, all of the new real world data becoming available.

Below we have done the same thing for the workshops.

Workshops

Image 3

The workshops seem to be a bit more directed as a “how to” instead of issue panels, which are directed more so at understand the issue and its implications. These “how to” workshops are mostly involved with outcomes, data, and research which are all fully expected and not out of the ordinary.

A couple of the more interesting words being used in the workshops was electronic and EMR. There were two workshops having electronic medical records as their focus:

  • A REALISTIC APPROACH TO WORKING WITH ONCOLOGY ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD (EMR) DATA IN OUTCOMES RESEARCH
  •  PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES (PROs) – USE IN ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS (EMR) AND IMPLICATIONS FOR COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH (CER)

We expect more of these types of workshops in the future as EMR data becomes more widespread. This data will eventually become another asset to health economists.